free and open
social media

Eric Forman

2014 FSP/Jerome Fellowship Artist

Radioscape

50’ diameter
Restored antique tripods, wood, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, car radio antennas, motors, sensors, custom electronics
2014

Artist Statement
My work creates modes of interactivity not found in dominant forms of new media: subtle, slow, thoughtful, equal parts delightful and unsettling. It plays on our uneasy fascination with new technology, yet does not cynically deny us its magical and exhilarating qualities. These are overlapping ideas of natural vs artificial, real vs simulated, person vs machine. In essence, I am investigating the uncertain present of human and technological co-evolution.

I like to push intersections between art, design, architecture, and science. I believe these divides are blurring, and these fields can learn from each other. To create objects and spaces that are aware of their environment and can dynamically respond to it, I develop my own interactive technology, customizing circuits, sensors, and code to interface with physical phenomena – people, movement, air, light, and sound. I believe this challenges not only the usual limitations of technology but the usual parameters of an artistic experience.
Sometimes the complexity of craft in what I make is transparently revealed as itself worthy of reflection, other times it is hidden to invite the viewer to focus on powerfully simple fundamentals of their own agency and perception. I believe the interfaces and experiences of the future must be engineered, yet also still contain mystery, difficulty, and beauty.

Sometimes the complexity of craft in what I make is transparently revealed as itself worthy of reflection, other times it is hidden to invite the viewer to focus on powerfully simple fundamentals of their own agency and perception. I believe the interfaces and experiences of the future must be engineered, yet also still contain mystery, difficulty, and beauty.

My installation at Franconia, Radioscape, combines old salvaged materials with new technology. I like the contrast and interplay between wood, metal, and circuitry, between obsolete mechanics and modern electronics. Here the antennas of old car radios harken back to a time when one station would broadcast simultaneously to millions of people. Now we mostly listen to our own media, by ourselves. The tripods have been used for centuries to compensate for technological limitations, and in some cases for human limitations, and despite being discarded, they are beautiful objects in their own right. Radioscape repurposes these scrapped objects into a strange kinetic landscape, responding gently to our movement, broadcasting silently to us and each other, with unknown objectives.

Eric Forman

www.ericforman.com

Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Resides Currently Resides in Brooklyn, New York, USA

Education
• Vassar College, BA, 1995
• ITP at Tisch School of the Arts (NYU), MA, 2002

facebook twitter instagram vimeo you t ube flickr